Berries Berries Everywhere!

One of the specialties in the North Country are fresh berries all season long – if we know where to look and what to plant. Right now, alpine strawberries, blackcaps (or black raspberries) and white pine berries are ripe and ready for harvesting. Alpine and white pine berries (strawberries) are small yet well-rounded in flavor and produce a lot during the hot summer months. Berries are full of antioxidants and have great flavor, providing our bodies with a flush of cancer-fighting resources during the time of the year that the sun is at is most harshest levels.

At the Tiny Diner, we grow some berry plants to showcase what we can plant to provide berries for ourselves and our bird friends. Here is a month-matching berry plant list that you can follow to wild harvest or plant if you have space. Be sure to come check out our gardens at the Tiny Diner to see what is ready and taste test a few!

May: Serviceberry, Honeyberry

June: Strawberry, Red Raspberry, Blackcaps, Golden Raspberry, Honeyberry

July: Blackberry, Currant, Gooseberry, White Strawberry, Blueberry

August: Blueberry, Elderberry, Grapes (not a berry but still same effects), Sandcherry, Chokecherry, Pincherry

September: Late-season Raspberries and Grapes

 

Weeds: The Good, The Bad, The Beneficial

What is a weed? And how can some weeds be ‘good’ while others are ‘bad’? The way we garden and produce food at the Tiny Diner creates a fluid definition of a weed. Any time a plant isn’t in a place where it has the most symbiotic space with other plants and animals we define as a weed. Basically, if a plant is in the wrong place at the wrong time for multiple functions.

We have plants growing around the Tiny Diner and at our rented 2-acre plot at Garden Farme that most conventional lawn care providers would define as weeds: plantain, white clover, dandelions, sunflowers, creeping charlie, etc. And to those of us who are used to looking at perfectly, over-watered and chemical-ridden lawns as ‘healthy’, our gardens are not uniform. And because they are diverse and layered and adaptive, they are actually way more healthy for many species, including us! Our growing spaces look more like a prairie or forest floor, with sprinkles of various low-lying plants that hold soil and produce flowers during the hard times of extended drought and inundations (dandelions, creeping charlie, etc.).

This Monday July 17th we are hosting a class called, “Weed Identification: The Good, The Bad and the Beneficial,” from 5:30-6:30. We will have a fairly large group and snacks with Q&A at the end so be sure to join us. If you can’t, we are hosting another class in August/Sept so stay tuned. For more class info: http://www.tinydiner.com/event/weed-identification-the-good-the-bad-the-beneficial/.

July Classes & Events 2017

Our July month is packed with great class themes about bugs, weeds, ayurvedic practices and youth candle-making and more. PLUS, our Farmers’ Market is every Thursday night in July! See below for more information.

 

Class: Good Bug, Bad Bug with Jessica Miller

Date: Saturday July 15th

Time: 3:00- 4:00

In this class we will share the wonder and fascination that comes from the world of insects. Have you ever felt disgust or fear from the sight an insect? We can help! Using current research and interesting facts we hope to add curiosity to your reaction and an appreciation of the services these insects provide. $5 suggested donation. Please email andrea.e@tinydiner.com with questions & to reserve your spot!

Instructor Bio: Jessica Miller has a Masters in Entymology from the University of Minnesota. This is a perfect fit for her as it combines her passions for insect and ecosystem health. She completed her Master’s Thesis on Minnehaha Creek and now shares her passion for insects through outreach and education. Check out more of her work on her website: Dragons Wynd, www.dragonswynd.com.

 

Class: Weed Identification: The Good, The Bad, The Beneficial

Date: Monday July 17th

Time: 5:30-6:30

Ever wonder what all of those unwanted plants are popping up around your garden? In this class, we’ll teach you how to identify these plants and what their purpose is in your garden. Looking at what’s growing in your yard can teach you a lot about what’s happening under the soil. We’ll talk about how to “read your weeds” as well as go over which common weeds are beneficial for pollinators, invasive, medicinal/edible or adding nutrients to your soil.

This class will meet at Tiny Diner and then travel one block to Bancroft-Meridian Garden, a permaculture-designed food forest that offers free fruit to the community.

Instructors Bio: Neal Baxter has been the coordinator of Bancroft-Meridian Garden for many years and is a board member on the neighborhood council. Andrea Eger has been a community organizer and organic farmer for the past 5 years.

 

Class: Summer Eating for Your Dosha: An Introduction to Ayurveda

Date: Thursday July 20th

Time: 6:30-7:30

Ayurveda is the ancient system of healthcare in India that translates to life wisdom.  Seasonal eating is an integral part of the holistic Ayurvedic approach to health and healing. In this class we will learn about the basic concepts of Ayurvdea and discuss suitable fruit and vegetables for different constitutions. We’ll also talk about the qualities and benefits of local produce and how eating according to Ayurvedic principles can keep you cool and healthy in the hot summer months. Suggested donation of $5-10. Please email andrea.e@tinydiner.com to reserve your space!

Instructor Bio: This class is taught by Dr. Vanashree Gadam in partnership with Minnesota Ayurveda Association and Svasti Yoga.

 

Classes for Kids

 

Title: Herbs, Weeds & Edible Flowers

Date: Wednesday July 12th 

Time: 9:00-10:30am

Even in the city, edible and medicinal plants surround us every day. During this class, kids and their families will learn about the plants, weeds and flowers they see right here in Minneapolis. We will go over which ones are edible and which are helpful. We will also cover foraging safety and how to harvest kindly. A short discussion will be followed by a tasting tour of the Tiny Diner’s garden and some plant-related fun activities! This class is pay what you can (suggested price per ticket $20). Email andrea.e@tinydiner.com to reserve your spot. Space is limited!

This class is suitable for children ages 3 – 9 years old, but all are welcome! Parents are required to be on site throughout the duration of the class and are encouraged to participate! Please bring sunscreen, a hat and a water bottle for your child. This event is rain or shine.

Instructor Bios: Megan Trehey is joyously overwhelmed by the beauty of the natural world. With a background in early childhood education, she has extensive experience gardening with kids and families. She has several teachers and mentors to thank in igniting her passion for this work, including Kathryn Jensen, Johanna O’Tigham, Linda Buturian and Lise Wolff. She is continuing her studies in herbalism with the Green Wisdom School of Natural and Botanical Medicine this summer. You can find Megan working and playing with Land by Hand, an ecological design, build and education organization that utilizes the principles of permaculture.

Clare Gardner Nieto grew up roaming the woods and fields with her mother, a self-taught naturalist and expert gardener, who taught her from an early age the names and signatures of plants and the knowing of the natural world. Clare has studied herbalism with Lise Wolff, Liz Johnson and Matthew Wood, and flower essence therapy with Martin Bulgerin in Minneapolis and the Flower Essence Society in California. She is passionate about sharing her knowledge with kids so that they too get to know the wonder and magic of the natural world around them. She practices herbalism and flower essence therapy out of her home in Northeast Minneapolis and can be found on the web at www.claregardnernieto.com.

 

Title: Pollinators! (and Other Helpful Bugs)

Date: Wednesday July 26th

Time: 9:00-10:30am

We encounter them every day, but do you know who the pollinators are? During this class, kids and families will learn about our local pollinator friends and what they do important to support the earth. We will then explore the garden and see if we can spot them on their favorite plants and flowers! There will be an opportunity for each child to create and leave class with their very own way to care for pollinators.

This class is suitable for children ages 3 – 9 years old, but all are welcome! Parents are required to be on site throughout the duration of the class and are encouraged to participate! Please bring sunscreen, a hat and a water bottle for your child. This event is rain or shine. This class is pay what you can (suggested price per ticket $20). Email andrea.e@tinydiner.com to reserve your spot. Space is limited!

Instructor Bios: Megan Trehey is joyously overwhelmed by the beauty of the natural world. With a background in early childhood education, she has extensive experience gardening with kids and families. She has several teachers and mentors to thank in igniting her passion for this work, including Kathryn Jensen, Johanna O’Tigham, Linda Buturian and Lise Wolff. She is continuing her studies in herbalism with the Green Wisdom School of Natural and Botanical Medicine this summer. You can find Megan working and playing with Land by Hand, an ecological design, build and education organization that utilizes the principles of permaculture.

Clare Gardner Nieto grew up roaming the woods and fields with her mother, a self-taught naturalist and expert gardener, who taught her from an early age the names and signatures of plants and the knowing of the natural world. Clare has studied herbalism with Lise Wolff, Liz Johnson and Matthew Wood, and flower essence therapy with Martin Bulgerin in Minneapolis and the Flower Essence Society in California. She is passionate about sharing her knowledge with kids so that they too get to know the wonder and magic of the natural world around them. She practices herbalism and flower essence therapy out of her home in Northeast Minneapolis and can be found on the web at www.claregardnernieto.com.

 

Class: Frostbeard Youth Candle Making Workshop

Date: Friday July 28th

Time: 10:30-11:30

Kids will team up to create a community-inspired candle, discussing what their favorite things are in the neighborhood and how smells might represent those places or activities. From start to finish, participants will learn all the steps involved in the candle making process – melting wax, adding scent and dye, and finally pouring candles. Will the candles smell like lilacs from Powderhorn Park or basil from community gardens? Maybe ice cream or fresh cut grass – it’s up to your group to decide!

Each participant will bring home one 4oz soy candle and be able to pour several others. Proceeds from any extra workshop candles will go to local youth organizations and will be available for purchase at the Tiny Diner Farmer’s Market as well as Frostbeard Studio. Space limited! Email andrea.e@tinydiner.com to RSVP.

Suggested material fee suggested donation – $5.

Instructor Bio: Frostbeard Studio is located in the Powderhorn Neighborhood of Minneapolis and is known for their book-scented candles. Frostbeard started out in 2012 as a pottery studio owned by married couple Roxie, a ceramist, and Tom, a commercial animator. The mission of the studio is to connect with like-minded folks, make a positive difference in the world and create more book nerds.

 

Ongoing Events

Tiny Diner Farmers’ Market

Every Thursday in JULY

5-8pm 

Come enjoy the local fruits and foods, crafts and music of our community! Support farmers through local purchases and acknowledging the hard-earned abundance they create for us. For more information about the market, please talk to Katie, katie.m@tinydiner.com.

Happy Summer Solstice!

Welcome to the first day of summer 2017!

With our longest days happening yesterday and today, lets slow down, take a seat and observe all the life that is happening due to our sun. We have tons of foliage and blooms, fresh greens and bees, and sweet breezes and tasty berries. All of life on our planet is due to the perfect distance our Earth is from the Sun. Aren’t we lucky?

The word “Solstice” comes from the Latin words sol (sun) and sistere (to stand still). It may seem that during our summer solstice, the sun stands still because it is at it’s highest arc above us in the northern hemisphere. For various communities, it is the end of spring, the marking of fertility, and a remembrance to enjoy the abundance we can share during this season.

Let’s observe and appreciate the natural rhythms of our earth – our seasons, our rotation around the sun and the other more local rhythms in our backyards. If you were not able to celebrate with a toast of some kind or a fair summer wish to a neighbor, take the time to do so tonight, every night. Come to the Tiny Diner and celebrate the light with us!

Tiny Diner’s mustard, clematis and grapes galore! Full sun lovers.
Minnesota has up to 16 hours of daylight on Summer Solstice, between June 20th and June 21st.
Campfire on the Eve of June 20th, Summer Solstice. Honoring the end of spring, the beginning of summer, and being in place.